VISIONARY REVUE

PRIMORDIAL MOTHER



      Through a circular portal of clouds, we behold a vision of the Primordial Mother II (1985), her arms outstretched in an eternal gesture of offering. Her eyes are closed, her face serene. From above, a golden light descends and enters her, bathing her form with its radiance. Her robe and veils are green, the colour of abundance. Her bare feet and the folds



 
 
 


PARIS - SPRING 2003



of her robe spread out over the earth, infusing it with her life-creating powers. And in her womb, a spiralling cluster of stars bursts into life.
      The most ancient works of art we possess - stone carvings and statuettes reaching back some fifteen thousand years - depict corpulent naked woman as the fertile source of all abundance. The Venus of Laussel, the Venus of Lespugue - all of these give form to the Paleolithic Mother Goddess, who would then re-appear throughout history under countless guises. First as Our Lady of the Beasts and Goddess of the Hunt. Then, in Neolithic times as Goddess of Planting and the Fields. Finally, she was named in the Near East as Inanna, Ishtar, and Astarte; in the Far East as Kali, Lakshmi, and Parvati; and in the West as Eve, Sophia, Maria and Magdalene.
      Johfra’s image of the Primordial Mother must be seen in this tradition. She is all the goddesses just mentioned. For they all share the quality of investing this world with life. As Magna Mater, creatrice and genetrix, she is ‘the source,’ - and Life, her gift, spirals into creation from the matrix of her womb.
      This is seen in the clouds and the stars that move in the heavens, for she is Queen of Heaven. It is also felt in the water that flows over the earth, for she too is Queen of the Sea. And, for all forms of life that prosper on the Earth, she is their Mother. Her all-creative, life-giving power flows through them, and death is merely the redirection of this flow from one temperal form to another. The cycles of her manifestation are unending, and her fount of life is inexhaustable.
      In his Vision of Hermes Trismegistos, Johfra has included this figure at the bottom of the painting. As Nature, she plays a significant but minor role in the Hermetic creation. Now, in the Pantheist works, she appears alone and in her full glory.



 
 
 


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