VISIONARY REVUE


THE TRANSFIGURATION OF THE RESURRECTED
1961-82

      This altarpiece, which took Ernst Fuchs over twenty years to complete, brings together many of the styles and 'ways of seeing' which he passed through over those years. The figure of Christ (a self-portrait) reflects his Netherlandish style from the early 60's. Meanwhile, the jewel formations in the crown and wings represent a later development from his Cherub paintings in the early 70's. The two-headed eagle behind him has the 'massive' stone quality of many works from the late 70's, while the bands of yellow and purple in the background come from his Feuerfuchs period.



 
 
 


PARIS - SPRING 2004


AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW
with L. Caruana

6 PAGE ARTICLE

THE COMPLETE ARTICLE
FOR DOWNLOADING

      In June of 2001, I had the opportunity to interview Ernst Fuchs on a number of topics - his sources and inspirations, his rediscovery of the Mischtechnik, his project for a museum of Visionary Art.
      We sat in the studio of his villa near Monaco - myself near the fireplace; he, infront of his large Triumph of the Unicorn painting. During the entire interview, he painted one of the figures, effortlessly achieving some truly visionary effects.

VR - Where does the inspiration for your work come from? What is the driving force behind the creation of a work?
FUCHS - Well, when I first started to work from the imagination, I was about twelve years old. And the imagination became for me the only way to perceive reality... to shape it. At the same time of course I did like everybody else: I went to art school, took courses, and so on... I drew from nature. I found it rather fascinating to 'render' reality into a very convincing form, using the utmost of my ability.
Meanwhile, I realized more and more that the reality of the imagination is almost identical to the reality that everyone sees - that the two are more or less the same. So, over the course of my studies, I kept doing both - working from nature... making studies... and working from my imagination, as if I were portraying something that everyone could really see. Except, for the artist working from the imagination, nobody would ever know that such a thing existed, if he had never drawn it.


 
 
 


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