VISIONARY REVUE



NICHOLAS KALMAKOFF
AT GALERIE CHARPENTIER, PARIS 1928
The Women of Nadjis - 1911
NICHOLAS KALMAKOFF



 
 
 


PARIS - FALL 2004


EDITORIAL

L. Caruana
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      The VISIONARY REVUE is an on-going initiative to mark out and define Visionary art. In this issue, we present Nicholas Kalmakoff 'the Forgotten Visionary', whose life and art have earned him belated recognition as the 'proto-Visionary of the 20th century'.
      Though Russian, Kalmakoff lived the better part of his life in Paris, and was only saved from total obscurity when two discerning collectors rediscovered his works in a French flea market a few decades ago...
      This naturally leads us to Part I of an in-depth article on 'Visionary Art in France'. Unfortunately, in Paris as elsewhere, Visionary Art often leads a marginal existence. Hopefully this article will introduce contemporary French Visionaries to a broader audience, and save them from the obscurity that was otherwise slated to Kalmakoff...
      An exlusive interview with Ernst Fuchs provides an unending series of insights from the master Visionary of Vienna: the inspiration for his works, his rediscovery of the Mischtechnik, and the future of Visionary art. 'Ernst Fuchs Speaks'...
      It was with great sorrow that artists world-wide witnessed the passing of Mati Klarwein on the 7th of March 2002. His work explored an unusual number of hallucinatory states and translated them so successfully into painted imagery that Klarwein may be accredited with the invention of a new visual vocabulary. Tributes from Robert Venosa and Alex Grey round out a presentation of his life which offers images and insights from the artist himself. 'Mati Klarwein Remembered'.
      Several quotations from Hervé Sérane in the article 'Visionary Art in France' make it clear that Visionary Art is not Modernist or even Post-Modernist; it is Anti-Modernist. This is because Modern Art is, by definition, 'à la mode' - trendy, fashionable and 'of the times'. Meanwhile, Visionary Art echoes back and forward through the epochs and strives to be eternally relevant.
      Continuing along this line of thought, I wish to end this editorial with a few random remarks. These notes offer a series of comparisons to show how Visionary art is the antithesis of Modern Art.


 
 
 


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