VISIONARY REVUE



ERNST FUCHS IN CASTEL CARAMEL
working on the second painted version of
The Triumph of the Unicorn


VR - Do you try to understand your own works?
FUCHS - Always.
VR - But you don't share that with people.
FUCHS - (Sighs) You know, I realized that what I did in the past, I didn't understand very well. And suddenly, I've come to understand it much better now. So, I'm actually cautious about sharing my understanding because it changes a lot...
VR - But each thing you understand, manifests itself later in the next painting.
FUCHS - That's why it's a good idea, if you've worked on a painting, not to look at it for sometime. Then you see it with fresh eyes.
VR - In your own time you have also been a very successful artist financially. For an artist today who is starving, what advice would you give him?
FUCHS - Well, first of all, seeing art in commercial terms is a special point of education that an artist must learn - to estimate the value of art, in relation to becoming known. When I started, I gave my etchings as a present to anyone who liked my art. Many of my etchings from those first years have survived because I gave them to people. Just like that! - if someone liked it, I gave it to him. It was a kind of visiting card and, at the same time, kind of original. And, most of the friends that I made that way also became the artist's associate, or a collector in a certain sense, even an 'impresario'.



 
 
 


PARIS - SPRING 2004


So, I think that artists today, well... they expect too much in the beginning. Because it is a profession after all... art is a profession.
VR - And you have to practise, develop, mature.
FUCHS - Yes. After all, we don't have Werkstatte any more - you know - 'workshops' like the painters of the Gothic and the Baroque periods still had. Rubens used to have at least thirty people working for him! Today we don't have that opportunity of being educated in practice, of being in a studio which sells a lot of paintings and has a lot of commissions.
VR - As a painter you also had your 'Wanderjahre' - your period where you travelled a lot, where you acquired a lot of experience. Is that also necessary for being a painter?
FUCHS - Hmmm. I would say yes - because I like art, and I love to see masterpieces. When I go to a city, I already know where the masterpieces are... where I have to go to see Böcklin, or Grünewald, or whatever. This is maybe a peculiarity of my character - that I'm extremely interested in the art of others.
VR - And is it just the artists of the past who have this effect on you?
FUCHS - No, of course there are also many artists who were my friends, like Hundertwasser and Brauer, and all of the Fantastic Realists really.
VR - You have inspired a second or even a third generation of artists in the last thirty years. Do you think there is the possibility of a movement arising, similar to Fantastic Realism?
FUCHS - Oh it has already happened, don't you think? The influence of Fantastic art has been considerably strong, with followers all over the world - hundreds of people, good painters, bad painters... It even appeals to the very young. But it remains a fact that fantastic art has a great fascination, creating a certain following. I think that the museum I'm planning, based on the information we have of the talents and the artists of this movement, would have quite a good response.
VR - I certainly hope it does.


END



 
 
 


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