VISIONARY REVUE


      "Over time," he writes, "the women in my erotic works became more discreet and eventually disappeared, leaving only the faintest traces of their presence. Those interiors, no longer occupied by living beings, offered me in their stead a mysterious emptiness which invited all possibilities. A few remaining clues suggested their darker dimension.
      "From this moment on, I became fascinated by a series of rooms guarding their secrets. This metamorphosis in my work allowed me to explore man's most primitive fears and anxieties: distress, obsession, solitude, darkness, enclosure, the passage of time, abandonment and death." (69)
      A fine example of this new genre of work is his 1983 painting Hope. The slanting sunlight across the wall reveals an empty chamber where someone has been hard at work, building a model ship from balsam and glue. Erotic photos, reminiscent of Poumeyrol's own early works, are taped against the wall. It is only when our eye wanders towards the barred door that we realize the hidden protagonist's sad predicament, and why the sailboat offers him such a desperate and futile 'hope'.
      Liberated entirely from the human form, Poumeyrol exalted: "I could explore caves, passages, depots, shelters, garrets, pantries, attics and all hidden places... Wooden doors, their locks unchained, swung open to reveal stained kitchen sinks, enamalled gas heaters and even a bed with dishevelled sheets in a narrow alcove.
      "These labyrinthine places were lit by small openings whose cruel light unmercifully exposed



 
 
 


PARIS - FALL 2004


Hope - 1983

the objects within. Through these openings we could also make out the building's surroundings - the vague terrain and industrial wasteland, the swamps and distant rooftops - all these 'landscapes' blanketed by snow or autumn leaves in the golden light of day's end." (70)



 
 
 


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