VISIONARY REVUE

THE VISIONARY VIEWER


      Ultimately, the supreme task of the Visionary artist is to communicate his vision to the viewer, so that the person standing before the canvas may, himself, become a visionary. Sérane writes:
      "For the truly 'visionary' artist, the imagination is of the utmost importance because this faculty alone allows us to consciously remember our vision. Hence, the imagination forges a link to that profoundly poetic and orignal dimension, where the work of art becomes authentic and believeable. For this reason, the viewer standing before such a work of art may, himself, have the impression of 'dreaming awake'...
      "A strange sensation of vertigo invades his being. The silence inherent in the work induces in him a different sense of time, outside all normal measure. In this sense, the viewer himself becomes a visionary, suddenly aware of the space constructed by the painting and its unique experience of time. From whence arises that precious sense of timelessness which characterizes all the great works of visionary art across the centuries."
(16)
      And so, the Visionary's attempts will ultimately fail unless the viewer may also access and re-experience the original vision. In a similar way, all these explanations and definitions mean nothing unless we view the works of the artists themselves, and discover with our own eyes their spiritual dimension, timelessness and mastery of technique.


MICHEL HENRICOT

Open a new window to the Henricot Gallery

MICHEL
HENRICOT

      Born in Paris in 1941, he confesses to being largely "...self-taught. I was always at the Louvre, staring like crazy at the pictures there, fascinated by 'how it's done'." (17)
      His mastery of technique came about through a genuine desire to present visionary images directly and 'im-mediately' to the viewer, without the painterly medium interposed between the seer and the seen:


 
 
 


PARIS - FALL 2004


       "I like my canvases to have an invisible technique - a technique where we can't really make out the 'tricks'. That helps draw me in, so that I believe, I enter into the work. If I see too many clues to how it's done, a part of the mystery disappears."(18)
      The artist began exhibiting his work early in life, while still in his twenties. And it was in this way that he met Léonor Fini, with whom he shared a fairly intense relationship: "My greatest friendships have arisen through painting - like with Léonor Fini. It's a very strong link, extraordinary really... But if we were friends, it's because we had a common ground. I wasn't really influenced by her. Certainly, she wasn't influenced by me! It was more a way of seeing things..." (19)
      Fini's works from the 60's influenced, to a degree, the young Henricot. Depicted in a heiratic style with underlying geometrical forms, her graceful elongated figures seem to exist in timeless spaces that are dark and densely atmospheric. Henricot's earliest figures also have this graceful quality, but were more stylized and cybernetic, with ergonomic designs on their metallic skins. Sometimes they remained mere torsos, lacking hands to grasp or feet to stand.


ALCOVE - Michel Henricot


 
 
 


<--LAST PAGE

 


NEXT PAGE -->

 
 


HOME

 


EDITORIAL

 


KALMAKOFF:
THE FORGOTTEN
VISIONARY

 


VISIONARY
ART
IN FRANCE

 


ERNST FUCHS
SPEAKS

 
 


KALMAKOFF
GALLERY

 


FRENCH
VISIONARY ART
GALLERY

 


MATI
KLARWEIN
REMEMBERED

 


KALMAKOFF
LINKS

 


FRENCH
VISIONARY ART
LINKS